personal coding milestone achieved - importing colour data into Hemesh + Processing!!! Thanks Corneel Cannaerts for his HEC_FromObjFile class that I’ve hacked, and then for fixing my hack over an email to correctly lerp vertex colour to face colour. So to get from 3D scan to this you must:
1. Export 123D scan as obj file with texture.
2. Open in meshlab, do the texture color -> vertex color. Save as .obj 
3. Copy the HEC_FromObjFile into a .pde tab, change class name.
4. When it reads iterates through vertices getting parts 1,2,3 (x,y,z) tell it to also get parts 4,5,6 (rgb for vertex). Save that into an Arraylist of colors
5. Extend HE_Mesh class to store face color, iterate through faces, get face vertices, match vertex with colour data from your Arraylist. Lerp the 3 vertex colours to produce one face colour. Mesh.display()
6. Go to tumblr, let others know.

personal coding milestone achieved - importing colour data into Hemesh + Processing!!! Thanks Corneel Cannaerts for his HEC_FromObjFile class that I’ve hacked, and then for fixing my hack over an email to correctly lerp vertex colour to face colour. So to get from 3D scan to this you must:

1. Export 123D scan as obj file with texture.

2. Open in meshlab, do the texture color -> vertex color. Save as .obj 

3. Copy the HEC_FromObjFile into a .pde tab, change class name.

4. When it reads iterates through vertices getting parts 1,2,3 (x,y,z) tell it to also get parts 4,5,6 (rgb for vertex). Save that into an Arraylist of colors

5. Extend HE_Mesh class to store face color, iterate through faces, get face vertices, match vertex with colour data from your Arraylist. Lerp the 3 vertex colours to produce one face colour. Mesh.display()

6. Go to tumblr, let others know.

Abandoned work of 2011. I went to the British Museum and scanned this Colombian figure using hyper3D (which has now become cubify capture). Back then the scanning would produce these odd clumps as seen above the head and shoulders of the statue. I then rotated the texture file 90º. Since hyper3D generated texture files of lots of tiny disordered swatches, these would be totally misplaced creating this pixelly-texture-file glitch aesthetic, that I should’ve 3D printed! It shows how two years of refining scanning technology would never allow this effect to happen again. I guess the problem with cloud-based apps is that you can’t keep a legacy copy of the software either.

Sampling and remixing objects

Makerbot have kindly published my views on object sampling here. In summary I see a future in popularising a design approach of making variations, iterations and mash-ups of existing objects by combining 3D scanning, computational ‘remixing’ and 3D printing.

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In the lead… Thomas Heatherwick pioneered 3D scan art with the impressive Bleigiessen. 2005.

tPot(); and tCup(2); at the Generator.x 3.0 exhibition at iMal

tPot(); and tCup(2); at the Generator.x 3.0 exhibition at iMal

tPot(); tCup();

tPot(); tCup();

tPot(); tCup();  A tea set is created by sampling and remixing existing objects using 3D scanning from photographs (via hypr3D.com) and a custom made processing sketch that works as an interface to manipulate meshes and create ready-to-print files.

A message from whisperoftheshot
hey, what are you using for your 3d scans and is it available for download? I have tried spinscan with some quicktime issues.

Im using hyper3d, which is a free online service that uses the photo reconstruction method. www.hypr3d.com